Celebrate Jewish New Year with Innovative Kosher Wines from Around the World!

What better way to start the Jewish New Year than sharing great wines with loved ones? Traditionally, wine or grape juice is an important part of Kiddush, which means “sanctification” in Hebrew, a ceremony where a blessing is recited over wine or grape juice.

Wine and Pomegranate, a fruit symbolic of good deeds and wishes.

Royal Wine Corp is bringing a fresh selection of kosher wines from California, Israel, France and South Africa just in time for Rosh Hashanah, which falls on September 18th this year.

Organic Kosher Wine with Noble History

If you are sensitive to sulfites and want some quality organic kosher wine, you could try Herzog Variation Be-leaf Cabernet Sauvignon, a full-bodied organic Cabernet Sauvignon from Paso Robles with no added sulfites. Herzog Winery was one of the first in America to make kosher wines, with over 9 generations of winemaking. Founded by Rabbi Menachem Herzog, Herzog wines were so sought after by Austrian Emperor Franz Josef that he dubbed then-owner Phillip Herzog a Baron.

Herzog’s Paso Robles vineyard. Credit: Herzog Winery

Surprise Yourself With Wild Yeast Wines!

Have you tried wines fermented with “wild” yeast that originate from the vineyards? Winemaker and Master of Wine candidate Ido Lewinsohn, known for experimenting with wild yeast and whole cluster pressing, has made Segal Wild Fermentation Chardonnay and Segal Wild Fermentation Cabernet Sauvignon from Gailelee, Israel resulting in some unique wines representative of their authentic terroir.  

Galilee in Israel. Credit: Isaac Harari

French Winemaking in the Judean Hills

High fashion designer turned Winemaker David Suissa has made high-end kosher wines in Bordeaux before starting his winery Ephod in Israel. You can now try kosher red wines from vineyards in Judean Hills, Galil Elyone and Ramat Hagolan: EbiatarKeter, and Regesh, made with classic Bordeaux grapes Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Petit Verdot.

Ephod wines.

Kosher Champagne Back By Popular Demand

Established in 1808, Drappier in Champagne, France is known for their quality organic vineyards. After being out of stock for almost 15 months, three of their kosher champagnes are now back on the shelves, just in time for the upcoming Jewish New Year celebrations.

Drappier Carte D’or Brut, kosher champagne

Chill with Canned South African Rose!

For a fun twist, you can try J. Folk from South Africa, a fruity but dry and refreshing rosé that comes in packs of four 250ml cans.

J Folk canned rose.

About Royal Wine/Kedem

Founded in 1848, Royal Wine Corp. has been owned and operated in the United States by the Herzog family, whose winemaking roots go back eight generations to its origin in Czechoslovakia.

Today, Royal Wine’s portfolio of domestic and international wines range from traditional wine producing regions of France, Italy and Spain, as well as Israel, New Zealand and Argentina. 

Additionally, Royal Wine Corp.’s spirit and liqueur portfolio offers some of the most sought-after scotches, bourbons, tequilas and vodkas as well as hard to find specialty items such as flavored brandies and liqueurs.

The company owns and operates the Kedem Winery in upstate New York, as well as Herzog Wine Cellars in Oxnard, California, a state-of-the-art-facility featuring guided wine tours, a fully staffed modern tasting room, gift shop and catering facilities. Additionally, the winery houses the award-winning restaurant Tierra Sur, serving the finest, Mediterranean-inspired, contemporary Californian Cuisine.

Follow Royal Wine Corp on social media: @RoyalWineCorp; https://www.facebook.com/RoyalWineCorp/

A Breathless Experience: My First Time Breaking A Wine Bottle With a Saber

Have you seen a champagne or sparkling wine bottle being broken open with a saber? I have not, until I was very lucky to have a chance to try it at Breathless Wines, known for their traditional method (the original method for making Champagne) sparkling wine in Healdsburg when Dr. Thach and our group visited!

What is Sabering?

A saber is a type of sword with a curved blade associated with light cavalry in the early modern and Napoleonic periods. The technique of breaking open a champagne bottle using a saber, called “sabrage”, was popularized after the French Revolution, when Napoleon’s cavalries celebrated their victory by using sabers to open champagne bottles.

A saber breaking open a champagne bottle. Credit: Last Bottle Wines

Safety First!

For someone who has never held a saber, let alone cut a bottle open with one, it can be quite intimidating. Luckily, Breathless has very careful protocols guided by their friendly experts. I was led by Sharon, one of the Founding Sisters of Breathless Wines. The “Saberer” first puts on protective heavy duty gloves and safety goggles. Because of Covid-19, an extra pair of disposable gloves are worn before the heavy duty gloves, and of course I was masked up like everyone else. Also, using a cold bottle makes it easier to break.

The saber, cold Breathless Blanc de Noir bottle, and protective gear

Power Pose

Having the correct posture helps to wield power. To start, Sharon demonstrated how to stand sideways, almost like an archer, and hold the body (where the label sits) using my non-dominant hand. Of course, the bottle must be pointed far away from anyone – everyone needed to stand back!

Sharon demonstrating the power pose and how to hold the bottle.

Learning The Technique

Next, Sharon demonstrated the actual technique of holding the saber, and how to strike the bottle. With the saber in hand, the blade sits at an angle to the bottle, and I took a few turns running the blade along the bottle towards the lip, which is the breakage point.

How to hold a saber and where to guide it

Blast off!

Finally, the wire cage was taken off as an extra step to make it easier. Shortly after the demo, I was ready. My hand went faster than I was mentally prepared and POP! Went the top. I did not apply much force, and it felt a lot smoother than expected. Indeed, I read later that it is simply the force applied at a fragile point of the bottle – with already much internal pressure – that breaks it. Some wine was lost, but I held it up in victory, still shocked at what happened just seconds ago. I was relieved no one was hurt!

This happened within seconds!

Serving the Wine

What good is opening a wine if you can’t enjoy it? After sabering, make sure to check for shards before serving. We all got to enjoy a fresh glass afterwards!

Dr. Thach gets the first glass!

Certified Saberer!

Certificate and cork wrapped in Breathless Seal

Breathless Wines awards every Saberer with a “Certificate of Completion”, and the cork sealed with their signature Breathless label. I am really grateful for such an unforgettable experience, and hope to lose less wine next time!

Try it Yourself!

For more information and to schedule this exciting Sabrage Experience, please click here:
https://www.breathlesswines.com/Visit-Us/Sabrage-Experience

Wine Tasting in Paris and Falling in Love with Champagne

(Contributed by K. Lewis) – My favorite tasting experience I have ever had was during the Summer of 2017 in Paris, France. I went on this trip with my mom and aunt, and after exploring the city throughout the weekend, we ended our trip with a wonderful Champagne tasting on a small boat sailing down the Seine River. The tasting consisted of three different Champagnes. I knew I really liked wine at the time, but this was one of the first times I remember gaining an understanding of the fact that different types of sparkling wine actually taste very distinctive with their own unique set of flavors.

Three Lovely Ladies

Champagne Tasting in Paris with Family

The service that we received was fun, friendly, informative, and interactive. Our server provided an extensive background on what champagne really is, where it comes from, and how it is made. He told us what to expect before we took our first sip of each glass, and left plenty of time in-between each tasting for us to ask questions and discuss the wine while we continued our sailing tour of the city. Of the three champagnes, two were dry and one was very sweet. I learned that the dry ones were called Brut and Brut Reserve and the sweet one was called a Demi-Sec. They were all delicious, but I was very excited to try the sweet one because it was unique to me, and tasted like a dessert! 

Champagne we tasted

The Three Champagnes in Our Tasting

As we continued to sail down the Seine while tasting exquisite bubbly Champagne, I realized this was one of the best days of my life. The experience was so unique because it took place on a small boat, and we were treated to the sights of Paris. We sailed past the Louvre, the Eiffel Tower, the d’Orsay Museum, and many other beautiful must-sees of Paris. The day was cloudy but warm, and it felt like the perfect setting to fall in love with Champagne. I can’t wait to go back one day and explore more of the beautiful wine that Europe has to offer! 

The Boat

Sailing Down the Seine on a Warm Cloudy Day

Learn About Champagne from the Experts – Free!

What do you think of when you hear “Champagne”? While the name is sometimes used generically for sparkling wine especially in the United States, Champagne only comes from Champagne, France. The name is actually protected by French statutes since 1887, with over 120 national jurisdictions today restricting the use of the name to sparkling wines exclusively produced from grapes in the French region and using the traditional method (méthode champenoise, also is a protected designation).

MOOC_Tray

Sparkling Glasses of Champagne. Photo Credit: Comité Champagne

The Official Comité Champagne

Behind its exclusivity and luxurious connotations, Champagne – both the wine and region – is a living heritage with unique culture that is fascinating and one worth studying. Who better than the Champagne experts themselves to reveal the secrets of this exceptional wine? The Comité Champagne, the official trade organization representing the region’s 16,100 growers and 360 houses, is now offering a free Massive Open Online Course (“MOOC”). Guided by Master of Wine Jeremey Cukierman, this MOOC delivers a comprehensive coverage of the Champagne appellation and wines in a series of short but informative videos, which will turn you in less than five hours into a Champagne expert. The course is available anytime and from anywhere.

 Tricks of the Trade

From sommeliers, wine merchants, to everyday enthusiasts, anyone interested in Champagne will benefit from this course. In four modules, learners explore topics including the diversity and tasting of the Champagne wines, the winemaking process, and about the region’s unique terroir, history and economy. In addition, you have an option of upgrading to obtain a Statement of Completion from the Comité Champagne with the passing of a quiz, and extra access to further content for €49 (~$53 USD).

Check it out yourself here: https://www.champagne-mooc.com/